Friday, October 10, 2014

WOMB TRANSPLANT BABY BORN AT 31 WEEKS THROUGH C-SECTION AND OTHER LUCIFERIAN TECHNOLOGIES

Photo Credit - The Lancet

I must say that after reading all of the articles below, I cannot help but feel depressed. How is it possible that not a single one of these articles raises the question of what impact this type of beginning will have on the child? Isn't the child's experience relevant? Shouldn't we be asking questions like...

1. How does it feel to be "conceived" in a loveless laboratory, with sperm that your father has given while jerking off in a masturbatorium filled with pornographic magazines and videos, and with an egg that has been surgically taken out of your mother's body, placed in a petri dish, forcibly inseminated with needles (like rape), and then later, once fertilized, surgically placed back inside your mother's body in a womb that does not belong to her?

2. How does it feel to be gestating in a womb where your mother is taking highly poisonous "medicine" the entire time you are in there so that her body does not reject the alien womb you are gestating in that actually belongs to a 61-year-old woman and not your mother?

3. How does it feel to have all of those toxins from your mom's "medicine" move through the placenta into your fragile and developing body?

4. How hard is it to stay alive when you are systematically poisoned for months at a time? What are the chances that this child will be healthy, having been exposed to drugs that are known to cause cancer throughout it's entire gestation?

5. What are the chances this child will develop a similar disorder to the one it's mother has, which includes being born with a missing kidney?

6. Will the child develop normal reproductive organs? Will the child be able to reproduce?

7. How do we think this child will feel having spent time in a womb where it was constantly watched by luciferian scientists, repeatedly blasted with ultrasound frequencies that are highly detrimental to developing babies, and then forcibly cut out of the womb at 31 weeks of gestation only to be placed in a neonatal intensive care unit where the ritual torture of infants is the norm?

8. Should we not be concerned that they have created artificial penises and vaginas in laboratories and are placing these units inside human bodies?

9. Should we not be concerned when these mad scientists are talking about taking wombs out of dead women and using them for womb transplants, especially in light of the fact that the medical profession is deliberately murdering people in order to harvest their organs?

10. Do people not see the very dark energies involved in using the body parts of dead people to create living people with artificial reproductive technologies. Taking wombs from dead women is just as sick as taking eggs from aborted female babies and sperm from dead men to create IVF babies. THIS IS SATANIC!!!

11. Why are the media so focused on the success of these luciferian scientific endeavors rather than on the impact this will have on the children and the future of our species?

It's very disturbing!!!

Source Article:
Mother With Womb Transplant Says Risk Paid Off
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/mother-womb-transplant-risk-paid-off-25961789

For the world's first baby born to a woman with a transplanted womb — a medical first — only a victorious name would do.

Which is why his parents named him "Vincent," meaning "to conquer," according to his mother.

The 36-year-old Swedish mother learned she had no womb when she was 15 and was devastated, she said Saturday in an interview with The Associated Press.

"I was terribly sad when doctors told me I would never carry my own child," said the woman, who asked not to be identified.

More than a decade later, she heard about research led by Dr. Mats Brannstrom, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Gothenburg and Stockholm IVF, on transplanting wombs into women who didn't have one. She immediately signed up.

"Mats told us there were no guarantees, but my partner and I, maybe we like to take risks, we thought this was the perfect idea," she said.

The woman's mother had wanted to be a donor but wasn't a match. Instead, she received her new womb from a 61-year-old family friend, who had previously had two sons.

The womb donor is now baby Vincent's godmother and her two sons have also come to visit the family.

"She is an amazing person and she will always be in our lives," the mother said. "And she has a very special connection to my son."

Brannstrom said it was "a fantastic feeling" to know that his research had led to Vincent's birth.

The feat opens up a new but still experimental alternative for some of the thousands of women who are unable to have children because they lost a uterus to cancer or were born without one. Before this case proved the concept can work, some experts had questioned whether a transplanted womb could nourish a fetus.

Others have questioned whether such an extreme step — expensive and fraught with medical risks — would be a realistic option for many women.

Dr. Glenn Schattman, past president of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technologies and a Cornell University fertility specialist, said womb transplants are likely to remain very uncommon.

"This would not be done unless there were no other options," he said. "It requires a very long surgery and not without risk and complications."

For the proud parents, the years of research and experimentation were well worth the wait.

"It was a pretty tough journey over the years, but we now have the most amazing baby," the father said in a telephone interview. "He is very, very cute, and he doesn't even scream, he just murmurs."

He said he and his wife, both competitive athletes, were convinced the procedure would work, despite its experimental nature.

Brannstrom and colleagues transplanted wombs into nine women over the last two years as part of a study, but complications forced removal of two of the organs. Earlier this year, Brannstrom began transferring embryos into the seven other women. He said there are two other pregnancies at least 25 weeks along.

Before these cases, there had been two attempts to transplant a womb — in Saudi Arabia and Turkey — but no live births resulted. Doctors in Britain, France, Japan, Turkey and elsewhere are planning to try similar operations, but using wombs from women who have just died instead of from live donors.

The Swedish woman had healthy ovaries, but she was born without a uterus — a syndrome seen in one girl in 4,500. The donor had gone through menopause after giving birth to two children.

Brannstrom said that he was surprised such an old uterus was so successful, but that the most important factor seemed to be that the womb was healthy.

The recipient has had to take three medicines to prevent her body from rejecting the new organ. About six weeks after the transplant, she got her menstrual period — a sign the womb was healthy.

After one year, when doctors were confident the womb was working well, they transferred a single embryo created in a lab dish using the woman's eggs and her husband's sperm.

The woman, who has only one kidney, had three mild rejection episodes, including one during pregnancy, but all were successfully treated. The research was paid for by the Jane and Dan Olsson Foundation for Science, a Swedish charity.

The baby's growth and blood flow to the womb and umbilical cord were normal until the 31st week of pregnancy, when the mother developed a dangerous high-blood-pressure condition called preeclampsia.

After an abnormal fetal heart rate was detected, the baby was delivered by cesarean section. He weighed 3.9 pounds (1.8 kg) — normal for that stage of pregnancy. Full gestation is about 40 weeks. The baby was released from the neonatal unit 10 days after birth.

Details of the case are to be published soon in the journal Lancet.

Brannstrom said he was concerned he might have hurt the womb during the C-section and said they would have to wait a couple of months before knowing if a second pregnancy is possible.

"As soon as I felt this perfect baby boy on my chest, I had tears of happiness and enormous relief," the mother said. "I felt like a mother the first time I touched my baby and was amazed that we finally did it."

Though she and her husband are adjusting to some sleepless nights, she said Vincent is a very calm baby and they are all enjoying "the usual amazing moments" new parents experience.

She acknowledged that taking the anti-rejection medicines isn't easy.

"All the medicines are wearing on my body and my other organs, so we will have to see how it develops," she said, adding she and her husband would be willing to go through it again for a second baby.

"I have always had this large sorrow because I never thought I would be a mother," she said. "And now the impossible has become real."


Source Article:
Womb transplant: first picture of baby born after pioneering operation
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/11140527/Womb-transplant-first-picture-of-baby-born-after-pioneering-operation.html

The parents of the first baby to be born from a transplanted womb have told of their delight at his arrival.

The baby boy’s birth took place in Sweden after surgeons at the University of Gothenburg performed the pioneering transplant procedure.

He was delivered by caesarean section in the 31st week of pregnancy and weighed 3.9 pounds — normal for that stage of pregnancy.

Both mother and child are now at home and said to be doing well.

The identity of the parents, a Swedish couple, has not been released, but the baby’s father said: “It was a pretty tough journey over the years, but we now have the most amazing baby.

“He is very, very cute, and he doesn’t even scream, he just murmurs."

He added: "He’s no different from any other child, but he will have a good story to tell. One day he can look at the newspaper articles about how he was born and know that he was the first in the world to be born this way."

He spoke as the first picture of the baby was published, amid widespread excitement over a procedure which offers renewed hope to thousands of infertile women around the world.

British experts said that they were preparing to carry out a similar procedure next year. If successful it could help 15,000 British women who suffer from the same type of infertility to carry their own child.

The baby boy’s birth took place in Sweden after surgeons performed the pioneering transplant procedure

The birth of the Swedish baby is understood to have taken place within the last month, after doctors transplanted wombs into several women who had a rare genetic condition that meant they were born without their own womb.

In January, one of the patients underwent IVF treatment that resulted in an embryo being transferred to her new womb. The donated womb came from a 61-year-old woman, a close family friend who had gone through menopause after giving birth to two children.

The 35-year-old mother is a patient of Dr Mats Brannstrom, professor of obstetrics and gynaecology at the Sahlgrenska Academy in Gothenburg.

The mother had to take three medicines to prevent her body from rejecting the new organ. About six weeks after the transplant, she got her menstrual period - a sign the womb was healthy.

After one year, when doctors were confident the womb was working well, they transferred a single embryo created in a lab dish using the woman's eggs and her husband's sperm.

The woman, who has only one kidney, had three mild rejection episodes, including one during pregnancy, but all were successfully treated with medicines.

The baby's growth and blood flow to the womb and umbilical cord were normal until the 31st week of pregnancy, when the mother developed preeclampsia, a dangerous high-blood-pressure condition.

After an abnormal fetal heart rate was detected, the baby was delivered by cesarean section.

Mats Brannstrom and his team performing a womb transplant

Prof Brannstrom, who led the research and delivered the baby with the help of his wife, a midwife, said: “The baby is fantastic. But it is even better to see the joy in the parents and how happy he made them.

“That was a fantastic happiness for me and the whole team, but it was an unreal sensation also because we really could not believe we had reached this moment. Our success is based on more than 10 years of intensive animal research and surgical training by our team and opens up the possibility of treating many young females worldwide that suffer from uterine infertility.”

Liza Johannesson, a gynaecological surgeon on the team, said: “It gives hope to those women and men that thought they would never have a child, that thought they were out of hope.”

Richard Smith, a consultant gynaecological surgeon at Queen Charlotte’s Hospital in London, said he was preparing to do similar operations here next year, funded by the charity Womb Transplant UK.

He said on Saturday: “This is unbelievably exciting, its brilliant. It looks like everything has gone very well and its really wonderful news. What’s happened here is so exciting because the great unknown has been answered.”

Mr Smith said his own team’s research in this area was going well and should be able to begin work on womb transplants in Britain next summer.

He said: “We’ve finished all the lab research and pre-transplant human research and we’re almost ready to go. The only big issue is we’re short of funds, which we’ve been all the way along.

“We are submitting applications for ethics approval in the next few weeks with a view to doing human live transplants in the UK next year.

“We have moved from an atmosphere where people were really quite against this procedure to where people are quite supportive. We have 60 patients on the waiting list for this procedure.”

The Swedish couple, both competitive athletes, will have to decide shortly if they want a second baby.

The drugs used to prevent the womb being rejected would be damaging in the long term - so the couple will either try again or have the womb removed.

The father said: “We will definitely think about that. But right now, we’re very happy with just one baby.”

After the caesarean section, the womb would be left in place until the mother has completed her family and then removed so that drugs to stop the body rejecting the organ could be halted. The drugs carry an increased risk of cancer.

The operation, follow-up and immunosuppressant drugs cost £100,000, with the research paid for by the Jane and Dan Olsson Foundation for Science, a Swedish charity.

The only other options for women born without a womb were adoption or surrogacy if she wanted to have a child genetically related to her, but this is legally complicated.

Doctors around the world have welcomed the first successful birth from a transplant.

Prof Sheena Lewis, Professor of Reproductive Medicine at Queens University Belfast and Chair of British Andrology Society said: “This is another step forward in the treatment of infertile women.

“The questions we have asked in the past about such a study have been: are the donors fully informed of the risks of such an operation. If so, and they agree, that seems acceptable.

“The other question is whether the transplanted womb is adequate in providing the optimal environment for the growing foetus. We will watch the progress of this baby with Interest and hope.”

Dr Allan Pacey, the chairman of the British Fertility Society, told BBC News: "I think it is brilliant and revolutionary and opens the door to many infertile women.

"The scale of it feels a bit like IVF. It feels like a step change. The question is can it be done repeatedly, reliably and safely."

The first womb transplant was done in Saudi Arabia in 2000 but failed shortly afterwards.

In 2011 Derya Sert, 21, received a womb from a dead donor in Turkey. She conceived a child but no heartbeat was detected and it was later terminated.

In 2012 it was announced by Dr Brannstrom that nine womb transplants had been carried out and all were successful.

Eight of the recipients suffer from MRKH syndrome, a congenital disorder which affects one in 5,000 women and prevents the womb from developing.

The ninth had her womb removed after suffering cervical cancer.

The only other options for women born without a womb is adoption or surrogacy if she wants to have a child genetically related to her but this is legally complicated in the UK.

Source article:
First Baby Born From Womb Transplant
http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/first-baby-born-womb-transplant

For the first time the recipient of a womb transplant has given birth, marking a milestone in the treatment of infertility.

The 36-year old mother, whose name has not been made public, has Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuester-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome, in which women are born without part or all of their womb or vagina. The success of artificial vaginas to treat some forms of MRKH was confirmed earlier this year, but a womb is a more challenging organ to replicate.

A team led by Professor Matts Brännström of the University of Gothenburg have indicated they will report in The Lancet on a successful birth from a transplanted uterus. Brännström had previously announced transplanting uteri from nine donors into women who either had MRKH syndrome or previous hysterectomies, in one case from mother to daughter. Seven of these transplants appear successful, with the women beginning to menstruate within 2-3 months. In the other two cases hysterectomies needed to be performed as a result of infection or clotting.

Even where the transplants are showing promise, the women's immune systems sometimes started to reject the new wombs - three times in the case of the eventual mother. However, adjustment of the corticosteroid drug regimes brought the problems under control in all cases. Unfortunately, these drugs have side-effects, so the wombs will be removed once the recipients no longer want more children.

A year after the 10-hour surgery was completed an early stage IVF embryo was inserted in the mother. Since her ovaries were unaffected by her MRKH syndrome, her own eggs were used.

"Our success is based on more than 10 years of intensive animal research and surgical training by our team and opens up the possibility of treating many young females worldwide that suffer from uterine infertility," Braennstroem told The Lancet.

The authors noted, "Absolute uterine factor infertility is the only major type of female infertility that is still viewed as untreatable." This can no longer be considered the case, even if the success rate of such treatments is yet to be established. Brännström has acknowledged that it is likely to be a long time before the procedure will be common, and concerns have been expressed about the health impact for live donors.

A caesarian was conducted 8 weeks prematurely as a result of pre-eclampsia, and both mother and son are doing well a month later.

The transplanted womb came from a 61 year old friend of the recipient who had experienced menopause seven years earlier, making for a much larger pool of potential donors than would be available if only pre-menopausal wombs were viable.

Two other hospitals are known to have attempted womb transplants, but both proved unsuccessful.