Friday, July 25, 2014

LINK BETWEEN POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION AND RISK OF HOMELESSNESS TWO TO THREE YEARS AFTER BIRTH



This is an important study. And what would make it even more powerful is to ask the question of whether these moms were suffering from postpartum post traumatic stress and whether technological interventions were used during the birth process -- and which ones. For example, an important question to ask would be -- was pitocin used during labor, despite the fact that it is becoming clear that its introduction during labor will shut down the mother's production of natural oxytocin -- a hormone that is absolutely necessary for her to properly bond with and breastfeed her baby? Were mother and baby separated at any time during the first two hours after birth -- even though there is a good deal of evidence to indicate that this causes harm to the mother-infant bond?

In fact, every single technological intervention being used during hospital birth negatively influences the mother-infant bond and has the potential to cause postpartum depression. When a mother cannot bond with her baby -- i.e., when she cannot make skin-to-skin contact with her own child (due to swaddling or separation), from an evolutionary perspective, her body has no way to interpret this other than to think the baby is dead! Naturally, her body will then produce the neurobiology of GRIEF AND MOURNING rather than the neurobiology of JOY AND LOVE, and this will lead to postpartum depression.

And so hospital birth is causing a breakdown in the human psyche and energy field that goes far beyond what we have previously imagined. It is causing birthing mothers and their children to live in a vortex of trauma amounting to untold suffering for mothers, children, and families.

Hospital birth trauma is at the root of postpartum depression and much more. It needs to end now. If you are thinking of giving birth in a hospital, please think again, Protect yourself and your children. Stay home!

Source Article:
Depression during a mother’s postpartum year linked to homelessness risk
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140717180256.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fmind_brain%2Fchild_development+%28Child+Development+News+--+ScienceDaily%29


Source: American Public Health Association (APHA)

Summary: A new study finds a strong association between depression during a mother's postpartum year and subsequent homelessness and risk for homelessness. The study reviewed interview responses and medical records regarding depressive symptoms and homelessness status among 2,974 mothers before and after birth.

A new study from the American Journal of Public Health finds a strong association between depression during a mother's postpartum year and subsequent homelessness and risk for homelessness. The study reviewed interview responses and medical records regarding depressive symptoms and homelessness status among 2,974 mothers before and after birth.

Data collected were a part of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study that randomly selected birth logs from 75 hospitals in 20 U.S cities with populations over 200,000.

The study found that 13 percent of the women experienced depression during their postpartum year. Even among women who had no personal or family history of mental illness, depressive symptoms or housing insecurity, the researchers found a strong association between depression during the postpartum year and homelessness or risk of homelessness two to three years later.

"Overall our study provides robust evidence that maternal mental illness places families with young children at risk for homelessness, adds to the scant literature that elucidates directional and causal links between mental illness and homelessness, and contributes to a largely stagnant but important body of literature on family homelessness," the researchers explain.

Journal Reference: Marah A. Curtis, Hope Corman, Kelly Noonan, Nancy E. Reichman. Maternal Depression as a Risk Factor for Family Homelessness. American Journal of Public Health, 2014; e1 DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2014.301941