Monday, July 8, 2013

HEPATITIS B VACCINE LINKED TO MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS




Let's see -- this toxic vaccine has been shown to cause neurodevelopmental problems, autism, SIDS, liver damage, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, leukemia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and now multiple sclerosis. How many more severe health problems will be linked to this neurotoxic vaccine -- a vaccine that is MANDATED in many states to be given to newborn infants?

Please protect your children! DO NOT VACCINATE!

Source Article:
Hepatitis B Vaccine May Be Linked to MS
Findings of Threefold Increased Risk Contradict Most Previous Research
http://www.webmd.com/multiple-sclerosis/news/20040913/hepatitis-b-vaccine-may-be-linked-to-ms

"Sept. 13, 2004 --The hepatitis B vaccine series has been administered to more than 20 million people in the U.S. and more than 500 million people in the world. It is more than 95% effective in preventing an infection that kills millions annually. However anecdotal evidence has linked the vaccine to an increased risk for multiple sclerosis.

Now a new study in the Sept. 14 issue of the journal Neurology offers the some of the strongest evidence supporting the link.

In the study, researchers report that vaccination with the recombinant hepatitis B vaccine is associated with a threefold increased risk of multiple sclerosis.

They concluded that the benefits of the vaccine still appear to outweigh the risks, but added that the findings "challenge the idea that the relation between hepatitis B vaccination and the risk of MS is well understood."

"We aren't policy makers, but it is important to recognize that many lives are saved by this vaccine," researcher Susan Jick, DSc, tells WebMD. "We certainly aren't suggesting that people stop getting vaccinated. But this study raises important questions."

The actual cause of MS is still unknown but MS is believed to be an autoimmune disease in genetically susceptible persons. Reports of hepatitis B vaccination and MS were from anecdotal case reports, not scientifically controlled studies.
A Billion Doses

Approximately 350 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis B virus, and as many as 65 million will die from liver cancer or cirrhosis of the liver as a result. The hepatitis B vaccine has generally been considered one of the safest vaccines ever produced, and more than a billion doses have been given since was first made available in the early 1980s.

Reports in the mid-1990s pointing to a link between the vaccine and MS lead the French government to temporarily suspend the routine immunization of pre-adolescents in schools, but most clinical trials have not supported the association.

Two years ago an immunization safety committee guided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Institutes of Health reported that the clinical evidence "favors rejection of a causal relationship between hepatitis B vaccine and multiple sclerosis."

In the newly published study, researcher Miguel Hernan, MD, used a national health database from the U.K. to identify MS patients and people who had gotten the hepatitis B vaccine. Roughly 3 million Britons were registered in the database, and the researchers included only 163 of more 700 cases of MS patients and 10 times as many people who did not have MS in the analysis.

The researchers estimated that immunization was associated with a threefold increase in MS risk within the three years following vaccination.
Most With MS Weren't Vaccinated

While conceding that the new study was well designed and well executed, University of Washington neurology professor Anne H. Cross, MD, argues that the exclusion of so many MS patients in the analysis could have been a factor in the outcome. Of 713 MS cases identified, the researchers included only 163 in their study and just 11 of these developed first symptoms of MS within three years of vaccination."


The
> hepatitis
> B vaccine has been linked to multiple sclerosis.
> A study in the Harvard Reviews of Health News,
> suggest that people who are immunized with the
> hepatitis B vaccine are "three times as likely to
> develop multiple sclerosis" compared to people that do not get the vaccine.
>
> Melissa Cloer received the hepatitis B vaccine
> and discovered that she had an electric shock
> sensation all over her body and numbness in her
> arm and hand. Melissa did not know the cause of
> her chronic pain until six years later. A medical
> exam showed that Melissa had multiple sclerosis
> caused by the hepatitis B vaccine.
>
> Although the hepatitis B vaccine can cause a
> similar reaction to that of Melissa Cloer, the
> CDC states that the vaccine is safe. According to
> the CDC website, "most published scientific
> studies do not support a causal relationship
> between the hepatitis B
> vaccination
> and MS or other demyelinating diseases." Although
> some studies suggest that the hepatitis B vaccine
> is safe, a recent study in the U.K suggest that
> the hepatitis B vaccine is not safe.
>
> U.K. Study Link Hepatitis B vaccine to MS
>
> Researchers in the U .K. retrieved data on
> patients that had received the hepatitis B
> vaccine from the General Practice Research
> Database (GPRD). The research study consisted of
> 163 cases of multiple sclerosis and 1,604
> controls. The research study concluded that
> people who received the hepatitis B vaccine were
> "three times as likely to develop multiple
> sclerosis" than a person who had not received the
> vaccine, according an article in the Harvard Reviews of Health News.
>
> Multiple sclerosis is not the only condition
> caused by the hepatitis B vaccine. The hepatitis
> B vaccine can cause other conditions. The
> hepatitis B vaccine can cause lupus, rheumatoid
> arthritis, diabetes, leukemia, and chronic
> fatigue syndrome, according to the Journal of Neurology.
>
> The Hepatitis B Vaccine will not Benefit Most Children
> According to WebMD, the hepatitis B virus is
> spread by body fluids and blood. A person can get
> the hepatitis B virus from sharing needles, sex,
> and tattoos. People who get hepatitis B are
> mostly adults and not children. Many children
> will not even participate in any behavior that
> will put them at risk for hepatitis B until they are teenagers or adults.
>
> The government should revisit its policy of
> vaccinating young children with the hepatitis B
> vaccine. Many children will not need the
> hepatitis B vaccine until they are able to make
> decisions that will even put them at risk for the
> disease such as unprotected sex and intravenous
> drug use. In addition, a research study conducted
> in the U.K. suggests that the hepatitis B vaccine
> can triple a person's risk of developing multiple sclerosis.
>
> References:
>
> Boyles, S. (2004). Hepatitis B Vaccine May Be Linked to MS.
>
> Retrieved from
> http://www.webmd. com/multiple- sclerosis/ news/20040913/ hepatitis- b-vaccine- may-be-linked- to-ms
>
>
> Harvard Reviews of Health News (2006, Aug. 21).
> MS Associated with Hepatitis B Vaccine.
>
> Retrieved from Infotrac Newsstand.
>
> Naismith, R., & Cross, A. (2004, Sept. 14). Does
> the hepatitis B vaccine cause multiple sclerosis?
>
> Retrieved from
> http://www.neurolog y.org/content/ 63/5/772. extract
>
>
> National Vaccine Information Center (n.d.).
> Hepatitis B Disease and Vaccine Facts.
>
> Retrieved from
> http://www.nvic. org/vaccines- and-diseases/ Hepatitis- B/diseasevaccine .aspx
>
>
> Sebelius v. Cloer, 675 F. 3d 1358 (2013)
>
> Published by
> R.
> Michelle Martin
>
> R. Michelle Martin attended Kaplan University and
> majored in Legal Studies with a minor in
> Psychology. Michelle enjoys reading, cooking, and
> traveling. She has professional experience in
> real estate
> invest...
> View profile
>
>
> http://business. highbeam. com/437395/ article-1G1- 169431245/ ms-associated- hepatitis- b-vaccine
> Harvard Reviews of Health News
>
>
>
> MS Associated with Hepatitis B Vaccine.(multiple sclerosis)
>
> Article from: Harvard Reviews of Health News | August 21, 2006 | Copyright
>
> MS Associated with Hepatitis B Vaccine
>
> In a British study, people who had received the
> hepatitis B vaccine were three times as likely to
> develop multiple sclerosis (MS) as people who did
> not get the shots, says an article in the Sept.
> 14 issue of the journal Neurology. These cases
> occurred within three years of vaccination, the
> study says. The study included 163 people with MS
> and was based on medical records for 3 million
> patients. Several previous studies have found no
> association between MS and hepatitis B shots.
>
> ST. PAUL, Minn. (American Academy of Neurology)
> -- The popular hypothesis that the hepatitis B
> vaccine is associated with an increased risk of
> multiple sclerosis has been scientifically
> corroborated through a prospective study of patients in the United Kingdom.
>
> Results of the study, and a related editorial,
> are reported in the September 14 issue of
> Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
>