Tuesday, November 15, 2011

PITOCIN – A COMMONLY USED DRUG IN CHILDBIRTH – WHAT’S WRONG WITH IT?




GREAT article about the dangerous and long-lasting effects of pitocin in labor.

PITOCIN – A COMMONLY USED DRUG IN CHILDBIRTH – WHAT’S WRONG WITH IT?
http://healyourearlyimprints.com/blog/?p=119


"...Pitocin has not approved for the elective induction or stimulation of labor.

Source: FDA APPROVED OBSTETRICS DRUGS: THEIR EFFECTS ON MOTHER AND BABY

Which means, that the common use of Pitocin in hospitals for inducing a mother post dates (without medical reason) is highly dangerous. The risks are too high for a non-medical induction. The use pitocin in labor to ‘speed things up’ is not FDA approved. You can refuse pitocin augmentation unless medical indicated that there is a reason other than someone’s bed space and watch ticking.

“Oxytocin crosses the placenta and enters the blood and brain of the fetus within seconds or minutes. There appears to be a correlation between fetal exposure to oxytocin and autism in the exposed offspring.”

The manufacturer of oxytocin warns the provider in the package insert:


“Maternal deaths due to hypertensive episodes, subarachnoid hemorrhage, rupture of the uterus, fetal deaths and permanent CNS or brain damage of the infant due to various causes have been reported to be associated with the use of parenteral oxytocic drugs for induction of labor or for augmentation in the first and second stages of labor.”

Because oxytocin is used so commonly to stimulate labor we note here that, in addition to the more benign effects of uterine stimulants, such as nausea and vomiting, the manufacturer of Pitocin (oxytocin) points out in its package insert that oxytocin can cause:

(a) maternal hypertensive episodes (abnormally high blood pressure)

(b) subarachnoid hemorrhage (bleeding in area surrounding spinal cord)

(c) anaphylactic reaction (exaggerated allergic reaction)

(d) postpartum hemorrhage (uterine hemorrhage following birth)

(e) cardiac arrhythmias (non-normal heart rate)

(f) fatal afibrinogenemia (loss of blood clotting fibrin)

(g) premature ventricular contraction (non-normal heart function)

(h) pelvic hematoma (blood clot in the pelvic region)

(i) uterine hypertonicity (excessive uterine muscle tone)

(j) uterine spasm (violent, distorted contraction of the uterus)

(k) tetanic contractions (spasmodic uterine contractions)

(l) uterine rupture

(m) increased blood loss

(n) convulsions (violent, involuntary muscle contraction(s).

(o) coma (unconsciousness that cannot be aroused)

(p) fatal oxytocin-induced water intoxication (undue retention of water marked by vomiting, depression of temperature convulsions, and coma and may end in death.


Fetal and Newborn Effects

The following adverse effects of maternally administered oxytocin have been reported in the fetus or infant:

(a) bradycardia (slow fetal heart rate)

(b) premature ventricular contractions and other arrhythmias (non-normal heart function)

(c) low 5 minute Apgar scores (non-physiologic neurologic evaluation)

(d) neonatal jaundice (excess bilirubin in the blood of the neonate.

(e) neonatal retinal hemorrhage (hemorrhage within the innermost covering of the eyeball)

(f) permanent central nervous system or brain damage

(g) fetal death

“Uterine stimulants which foreshorten the oxygen-replenishing intervals between contractions, by making the contractions too long, too strong, or too close together, increase the likelihood that fetal brain cells will die.

The situation is analogous to holding an infant under the surface of the water, allowing the infant to come to the surface to gasp for air, but not to breathe. All of these effects increase the possibility of neurologic insult to the fetus. No one really knows how often these adverse effects occur, because there is no law or regulation in any country which requires the doctor to report an adverse drug reaction to the FDA.

These findings underscore the importance of the midwife managing the woman’s labor in a way that will avoid the need for Pitocin and the pain relieving drugs that are often administered to help the woman cope with the contractions intensified by Pitocin.

DELAYED LONG TERM EFFECTS: There have been no adequate and well-controlled studies to determine the delayed, long-term effects of Pitocin on pregnant women, or on the neurologic, as well as general, development of children exposed to Pitocin in utero or during lactation.”



Were you aware that the drug so commonly used on pregnant women without medical indication is not FDA approved?

The link to the FDA page: http://www.aimsusa.org/obstetricdrugs.htm

And the manufacturers insert is here…
http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2007/018261s028lbl.pdf